Tag Archives: brewing

Charlie Bamforth on Beer & Terroir

Niagara vineyard, Ontario

Dr. Charlie Bamforth, an Anheuser-Busch endowed professor of brewing science at UC Davis, was my first beer guru, and remains a hero of mine. His book, Beer is Proof That God Loves Us: Reaching for the Soul of Beer and Brewing, was the first book about beer that I read. In it he shares decades of knowledge on brewing science, stripping down the jargon and turning up the interesting (salvation for a liberal-arts educated reader). He offers unflinching and educated opinions about the beer industry — many of them unpopular ones — and the best part, his love of the great malt beverage practically sings off of every page, proving that romance and science are not separate entities when it comes to loving beer.

When writing this story for The Globe and Mail on whether beer has terroir, I finally got my chance to hit him up for an interview, and despite the fact I only quoted him once, he has a lot to say on the subject, so I’m eager to share it with you here. As you can see, he practically interviews himself:

Does beer have terroir?

”The answer is yes, more so than wine not only in terms of water, but other things as well. Some of the great beers in the world were developed on basis of local water. Burton-on-Trent has phenomenally hard water with high levels of calcium, and the other extreme is Pilsen in the Czech Republic which has very, very soft water. The vast majority of beers are made up of at least 90 percent water. It is a critical component. But the brutal reality today is that you can adjust the water to anything you want, so if you’re interested in making the same product in different places around the globe, you can adjust the water to exactly match the water from the brewery’s original location.

“An accomplished brewer can make the same beer in a huge number of locations by adjusting things like the water so they can achieve real consistency. That doesn’t sit comfortably with some people. We like to tell stories. Winemakers don’t try and tweak things, they just use the local raw materials and tell stories about it, and say, ‘That’s terroir.’ Brewers can do that, but on the other extreme, we don’t have to leave things as they are…  We can adjust the water to whatever we want, for example, Burtonization is in the German Brewing Dictionary, it means adjusting water to match that in Burton-on-Trent.

“Is there terroir? Yes. But can I recreate that terroir in a different location by processing the water? Yes.”

Really, because I know quite a few breweries here in Canada that go on and on about their water as a distinctive aspect of their beer.

“It’s a marketing strategy about celebrating the water. It’s a very powerful marketing strategy, but it’s not true to say that I can’t recreate it. One of our local brewers here in Northern California they take the local water and de-ionize it — they take everything out and build up water composition to what they want. You can even recreate spring water, as long as you know what the content of that water is.

“The debate is: on the one hand we have the opportunity to highly control a process to produce a product that’s very, very consistent time in, and time out. The counter opinion is let’s take advantage of local differences to celebrate them, “Like, hey we’re using local water, grain, and growing our own hops… You can make beer excellently both ways, it’s all to do with passion and emotion.

“I used to work for BASS in the UK, and when I came over here 13 years ago I never drank it over here because it travels such a long way, and the beer goes stale and cardboardy.  These days, it’s brewed in New York they’ve taken the recipe and adjusted the water to meet specifications, but now because it’s not traveled across an ocean, it’s fresher and better than it would have been coming all the way from Burton-on-Trent.

Santiago’s Rothhammer Brewery uses German malts, and English and American hops to make all of their brews

So is the only true terroir in wild fermentation? It’s tough to reproduce those exact conditions.

“Yeah, so there would obviously be specific organisms in that particular beer that would have a significant contribution to the local environment, and that will make a difference — but we didn’t look at ten different places for different patterns of development of the different organisms, so we can’t actually say what the variation would be, but it’d be significant.

“There’s a book I read recently that made me angry, it’s by Alice Feiring, a wine writer, where she basically champions the terroir and importance of it to the extent of rubbishing the concept of adding yeast to a wine fermentation rather than taking advantage of the natural flora. That feeling — that everything should be spontaneous — and therefore we should ignore scientific understanding to achieve excellence every time would be naive.

“Now, it’s not as though I hate the idea of local ingredients and the locavore movement when it comes to making beer — on the contrary, I quite like it. There’s a brewery here in Sacramento called Rushtaller, which I’ve done some work with, and it celebrates the proud history of brewing in Sacramento and it’s working to resurrect local hop industry, which used to be very big. And their beers also use  locally-grown barley.

“The concept is wonderful and very appealing — and it appeals to me as well. There is a real beauty in that story. But when it comes down to could I take a beer from a local place and could I produce a pretty much perfect match for it thousands of miles away if I understand the water the specifications on the grain, the malt, the hops?  Yes, you can recreate the product.

“Do I think there’s anything magical about a given locality?  No.”

Well in terms of wine-making then, you’ve said that brewers have embraced scientific knowledge in the brewhouse in a way that winemakers have not, preferring to champion the terroir narrative. But could you, theoretically then, reproduce a match for a wine grown in a specific terroir?

“Well, I’m not an enologist, so it’s hard for me to say…

“Theoretically, is it possible to take a grape from different places and achieve a degree of consistency or match? I’d think it’d be worth exploring. If you understand the science of wine sufficiently should you be able to overcome differences from region to region? I would be amazed to think it could not be done. The chemistry of the grape is going to be complicated, but I don’t think there’s any magical molecules that you could get in some grapes that you can’t get in others, so by adjusting the process you should be able to bring grapes from two different places closer together…

“What brewers have done because of an increased understanding of the chemistry of raw materials is to make  adjustments and achieve consistency. The wine guys don’t even try to do that — instead they value the beauty of variation and of local terroir, and they champion and celebrate that — and it’s a perfectly valid approach. Brewing has achieved a far greater sophistication of science, but it’s possibly moved away from the romance associated with wine.

“Do I like the attempts being made by smaller brewers to make beers that exemplify local ingredients? Yes I do, I like that very much.”

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Beer and Terroir: Samuel Adams founder Jim Koch


Everything about beer fascinates me, but my lastest story, exploring beer and terroir for The Globe & Mail recently, has my head spinning.

The subject is only beginning to be explored by craft brewers, and I think that brewers are in the midst of redefining terroir in beer — as such, there are a lot of ideas, disagreements and some serious philosophising happening among beer drinkers, makers and marketers.

I tried to touch on the thrust of the debate in my story, but inevitably most of the indepth commentary from the people I spoke to had to be left out. So I am going to share the interviews here, beginning with a question I posed to Jim Koch on a visit to Samuel Adams brewery in Boston last week. (Note: I asked Koch this question after the story came out as it’s just so damn interesting).

Koch has a compelling take on the subject, with his outer hippie on full display.

The question: “Do you think that beer has terroir, and if so, does Samuel Adams have a particular terroir and what would that be?”

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TV, beer and Aldo Lanzini

Three of the things I’ve been up to this month.

TV
My fiance, Conor McCreery, a comic book creator and screenwriter, has been appearing on the Charles Adler show as a commentator on all things pop culture. Last week they wanted a female talking head to comment on Bridesmaids, a movie that I love, so I decided to give it a shot.  The day of I got super nervous, forcing Conor to play Adler and throw out all sorts of possible questions, over and over. I went to the studio armed with facts, and then, when we did the interview the questions were mostly personal opinion. No rehearsal on those, and no chance to show off all of my R&D. Once we got going, the nerves subsided (it’s easy to talk to a camera that doesn’t look back at you) and I was surprised by how much fun it all was. Now all I need is my own beer travel show.

My first two beer columns have been published in the Grid, and I have plans for more.  There is so much happening in craft and commercial brewing, so lots to talk about. The best part of this new gig has been how welcoming the beer community is — experts, writers and brewers all love what they do and don’t mind sharing their intel. In my latest column, on Barley’s Angels, I looked at women in the craft brewing industry and discovered that the act of making beer is totally girly. Unfortunately I couldn’t squeeze this fascinating history into the column, so I’m sharing it here:

Women parted ways with beer around the industrial revolution, when brewing ale, once the sole responsibility of the female, was moved into factories and drinking shifted from the home to the male-dominated pub. It’s a travesty, because beer is utterly feminine. High status females were the brewsters of chica in pre-Inca and Incan cities high up in the Andes, of Hekt in ancient Egypt, and in charge of the prestigious brewing trade in Babylon and Sumeria (modern day Iraq). Beer deities were always goddesses, never gods. Even the hyper-masculine Vikings favoured brewsters — Norse society law dictated that only women could own brewhouse equipment. Today, things are different. A 2004 Health Canada survey found that a quarter of men ages 19 to 50 drink beer, compared to eight percent of women, and men guzzle, consuming about 80 percent of all beer.

Anthropologist Alan Eames uncovered the female-dominated history of brewing — and more evidence is being unearthed every few years, like a recent discovery that high-ranking females were the brewmasters in pre-Incan societies.

Finally, I just finished up a piece for ELLE’s September issue exploring a fashion and pop culture trend — it was fun to research, and I’ll remain mum about what it is until publication, but I had the pleasure of discovering the work of Italian artist Aldo Lanzini.  His crocheted masks are mesmerizing and all about the construction of identity.

Check out this profile by Crane TV: http://static.crane.tv/player/flowplayer.commercial-3.2.5.swf?0.2654293088708073


			

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